snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Tag Archives: patent

Revised NOC Regulations to Come Into Force on September 21, 2017

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

The Government of Canada has announced that the amended NOC regulations will come into force on September 21, 2017. These amendments will implement sweeping changes to pharmaceutical patent litigation in Canada pursuant to obligations imposed under CETA. The changes will apply to proceedings commenced in respect of NOAs served on or after September 21, 2017.

The final text of the amended NOC Regulations does not differ from the initial draft published on July 15, 2017, as summarized by our previous blog here.… Continue Reading

NPEs Beware: Contorted Construction of a Patent Will Attract Elevated Costs

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents, Telecommunications

On January 4, 2017, the Honourable Justice Locke of the Federal Court of Canada released his decision in Mediatube Corp. et al. v. Bell Canada, 2017 FC 6. This was a patent infringement action in respect of Canadian Patent No. 2,339,477 (the “‘477 Patent”) by the plaintiffs, NorthVu Inc. (patent owner) and MediaTube Corp. (licensee) against Bell Canada  (including former Bell Aliant Regional Communications, Limited Partnership, together “Bell”). The plaintiffs alleged that Bell infringed the ‘477 Patent through the delivery of its digital Internet Protocol Television (“IPTV”) services called Fibe TV and FibreOp … Continue Reading

Competition Bureau Finalizes IP Enforcement Guidelines on ‘Pay-for-Delay’ Settlements, Pharmaceutical Product Switching, and ‘Patent Trolls’

Posted in Consumer Protection, Intellectual Property, Patents, Regulatory Compliance

On March 31, 2016, the Competition Bureau (Bureau) released revised Intellectual Property Enforcement Guidelines (IPEGs). These IPEGs reflect incremental changes to the draft version released for consultation last year. Most notably the new IPEGs provide further guidance on (i) pharmaceutical patent litigation settlements, (ii) product switching (also known as “product hopping”), (iii) collaborative standard setting and standard essential patents, and (iv) patent assertion entities.… Continue Reading

Canada’s Federal Court of Appeal Upholds C$180 Million Judgment in Favour of Merck Against Apotex in a Landmark Patent Damages Ruling

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

In a Judgment released July 23, 2015, the Federal Court of Appeal upheld the Federal Court’s award of more than C$180 million in damages and interest for Apotex’s infringement of Merck’s Canadian lovastatin patent. In this decision, the Federal Court of Appeal reversed the Trial Judge and held that the availability of a non-infringing alternative (“NIA”) is relevant under Canadian law but held that Apotex could not have and would not have deployed it.… Continue Reading

Canada and the EU Successfully Conclude CETA: What It Means to the Pharmaceutical Industry

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On September 26, 2014, Prime Minister Harper announced that Canada and the European Union have successfully concluded negotiations on a new trade agreement, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) that was five years in the making, and publicly released the consolidated text of the agreement.

CETA is deeper in substance and broader in scope than any other such agreement in Canadian history, significantly affecting all economic areas, including the pharmaceutical sector.

The CETA chapter on intellectual property is of particular interest to the pharmaceutical industry, because it will introduce into Canada for the first time:

  • additional (sui generis
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PM(NOC) Proceedings: Apotex defeats Bayer’s Canadian patent on oral contraceptive YAZ

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On June 4, 2014 Justice Roger Hughes of the Federal Court released his public reasons for dismissing Bayer’s prohibition application against Apotex in respect of its generic YAZ tablets on the basis that Apotex’s non-infringement allegation was justified. His confidential judgment was issued on May 7, 2014 and Apotex received its NOC the very next day. The term of Bayer’s patent was not set to expire until August 31, 2020. For the full written decision see: Bayer Inc. et al. v. Apotex Inc. et al. 2014 FC 436.

Although not determinative, this decision addresses the somewhat contentious issue of … Continue Reading

Responding to Canadian Patent Office Objections: Proof of Utility

Section 2 of the Patent Act

Posted in Patents

This is part of a series of posts reviewing common Canadian Patent Office objections to patent applications and claimed inventions and providing some insight into how these objections may be addressed.

The Objection

In a typical objection, the patent examiner asserts that the claimed composition of matter, while novel and non-obvious, cannot be patented because the application’s description fails to prove the utility of all claimed embodiments. The examiner usually will rely on:

  • the definition of “invention” in section 2 of the Patent Act as the statutory basis for the objection.
  • recent case law, mainly from abbreviated proceedings under the
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Hot Off the Press – Doing Business in Canada 2012

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property, M&A/Finance, Patents, Privacy, Trade-marks

If your organization is currently thinking about establishing or acquiring a technology business in Canada, the 2012 edition of Doing Business in Canada, written by McCarthy Tétrault, will prove to be a valuable resource. The guide provides a broad overview of the legal considerations that non-residents should take into account to help ensure their success as they enter into a business venture in Canada. Each section offers timely information, up-to-date legislative provisions and insightful commentary on different areas of law. After downloading the guide, we encourage you to consult one of our lawyers for a more comprehensive analysis … Continue Reading

Responding to Canadian Patent Office Objections: Patent Prosecution Primer

Posted in Patents

The Canadian Patent Act and Patent Rules provide the entire statutory framework for patent law in Canada. The Act and Rules contain all of the requirements to be satisfied before the Commissioner of Patents is obliged to grant a patent. These requirements relate to two main aspects of patents: (a) the nature of the invention for which patent protection is sought; and (b) the patent application that describes and claims the invention. 

The Act and Rules form a complete code for patent grant. Subsection 27(1) of the Patent Act requires the Commissioner of Patents to grant a patent if the … Continue Reading

Obviousness: New Decision Holds that Court is to Look at Patent Disclosure to Determine the Inventive Concept

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

To determine whether an invention claimed in a patent is obvious, what parts of a patent can the court consider to ascertain the inventive concept of the claims? According to the Federal Court decision in Allergan Inc. v. Canada (Minister of Health), the disclosure of a patent – not just the claims themselves – can be used as part of this inquiry.

In Allergan, Sandoz argued that the patent claims define the invention and, therefore, the inventive concept of the patent “must be discerned solely from the language in the claims of the patent.” However, the Court held … Continue Reading