snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Tag Archives: patent purchase program

LOT Network

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

In a previous blog post, we briefly discussed the LOT Network’s initiative in in the fight against patent assertion entities (PAEs), more commonly known as patent trolls. Since the publication of that post, the LOT Network has overhauled its member agreement and published new information and statistics on how the program is working to protect companies from PAEs We have provided below a brief summary of some of the key changes.… Continue Reading

Google’s “FFF” Patent Plan: Find It, Fight It, and Get It For Free

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

Recently, Google has announced two new patent-related initiatives. The first being the overhaul of Google Patents, a search tool of existing patent databases, and the second being the launch of the Google Patent Starter Program, giving away patents for free.

These two initiatives build on Google’s effort to impact patent reform in the United States and beyond. Prior to these announcements, Google’s efforts included the launch of the Patent Purchase Promotion in April (which we discussed here). Google has not officially released any information on the outcome of the Patent Purchase Promotion but Kurt Brasch, a lawyer at Google, … Continue Reading

Google’s Patent Purchase Program: In the public interest or a monopoly on patent rights?

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On April 27th, 2015 Google announced the launch of its Patent Purchase Promotion. The “experiment,” as Google calls it, allows patent owners, or those otherwise authorized to sell a patent, to set a price for their patent and offer it for sale to Google. The Promotion is Google’s attempt to “remove friction from the patent market” and “help improve the patent landscape and make the patent system work better for everyone.” By offering to buy patents direct, Google is attempting to provide an alternative to the lure of selling one’s patent to a non-practicing entity, more commonly … Continue Reading