snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Category Archives: Intellectual Property

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PM(NOC) Proceedings: Teva defeats VELCADE cancer treatment patent

Posted in Patents

In reasons dated February 26, 2015, Justice Barnes dismissed Janssen’s application for an order prohibiting the Minister of Health from issuing a Notice of Compliance to Teva for the compound bortezomib until the expiry of Canadian Letters Patent 2,203,936 (the ‘936 Patent). The ‘936 Patent relates to bortezomib and its use to treat cancer.

The fatal finding for the ‘936 Patent was its characterization by the Court as a selection patent. Justice Barnes held that bortezomib falls within a genus of compounds claimed by an earlier patent, all of which are said to be highly potent in the treatment of … Continue Reading

Federal Court Judge Dismisses Final Prohibition Application in CIALIS PM(NOC) Proceeding

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On February 23, 2015, the Federal Court released its judgment in the latest of three PM(NOC) proceedings relating to Eli Lilly’s CIALIS (tadalafil) patents. The previous two decisions were discussed in snIP/ITs posted on January 26, 2015 and March 30, 2015.

In the latest decision, Eli Lilly Canada Inc. v. Mylan Pharmaceuticals ULC, 2015 FC 178, Justice de Montigny found that Mylan’s allegations of non-infringement and obviousness were justified, and dismissed Lilly’s application for an order prohibiting the Minister of Health from issuing a Notice of Compliance to Mylan until expiry of Canadian Patent No 2,379,948 (the … Continue Reading

Canada PM(NOC) Decision: Federal Court Judge Criticizes “Very Sketchy” Disclosure in a CIALIS Patent

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On February 2, 2015 Justice de Montigny of the Federal Court released his judgment and reasons in Eli Lilly Canada Inc. v. Mylan Pharmaceuticals ULC, 2015 FC 125, dismissing Lilly’s application for an order prohibiting the Minister of Health from issuing a Notice of Compliance to Mylan until the expiry of Canadian Patent No. 2,371,684 (the “‘684 Patent”). The ‘684 Patent claims a dosage form of tadalafil and its use to treat erectile dysfunction (“ED”). This decision is the second in a series of three prohibition applications by Lilly relating to its tadalafil patents.

The use of tadalafil … Continue Reading

Canada Patented Medicines: Federal Court of Appeal Confirms Mootness of Innovator Appeals after Generic Marketing Authorization is Granted

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

“Asking a court to prohibit a notice of compliance after it has issued is like asking someone to close the barn door after the horses have escaped.”

With this analogy, the Federal Court of Appeal in Janssen Inc. v. Teva Canada Limited, 2015 FCA 36 has confirmed that an appeal from an order dismissing a prohibition application under the PM(NOC) Regulations becomes moot once the generic notice of compliance is issued. The Court dismissed Janssen’s appeal noting that it does not serve judicial economy to hear moot appeals.

In fact, the FCA has only exercised its discretion to hear … Continue Reading

Federal Court of Appeal Upholds Lower Court Costs Award of Over $1 Million

Posted in Intellectual Property

On January 14, 2015, the Federal Court of Appeal released its reasons and judgment in Philip Morris Products S.A. v. Marlboro Canada Limited, 2015 FCA 9. The Court dismissed the appeal, finding that Justice de Montigny of the Federal Court made no reviewable error in awarding the respondents over $1 million in legal costs and disbursements. The award amounted to nearly half of the respondents’ actual costs.… Continue Reading

Review of US Patent Claims Construction Gets Canadianized

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On January 20, 2015, the US Supreme Court rendered its precedent-setting decision in Teva[1] that reversed the Federal Circuit’s practice of reviewing all District Court claim constructions de novo on appeal. Instead the Supreme Court found that some decisions are entitled to deference as a consequence of certain factual findings that require Courts of Appeal to apply a “clear error” standard of review, and consequently, bringing the review of US claims constructions methodology more in line with the Canadian approach.… Continue Reading

Canadian Patent Judge Takes a Hard Stand Against Generic CIALIS® (tadalafil)

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On January 7, 2015, Justice de Montigny of the Federal Court released his judgment and reasons in Eli Lilly Canada Inc. v. Mylan Pharmaceuticals ULC, 2015 FC 17, allowing Lilly’s application for an order prohibiting the Minister of Health from issuing a Notice of Compliance to Mylan until the expiry of Canadian Patent No. 2,226,784 (the “‘784 Patent”). The patent relates to Lilly’s successful erectile dysfunction (“ED”) drug CIALIS® (tadalafil).

The Court found that Mylan’s allegations of invalidity on the basis of lack of utility and obviousness-type double patenting were unjustified. Justice de Montigny’s reasons signal the Court’s … Continue Reading

I Know You Know, Because I Told You So: Effective Notice of Infringement

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

Copyright infringement is normally a factual question – it doesn’t matter whether one intended to copy a substantial part of someone else’s original expression if, in fact, one did so[1] – but there are circumstances where the alleged infringer’s state of mind does matter.  Knowledge is relevant to secondary infringement under s. 27 of the Canadian Copyright Act, or to the assessment of statutory damages under s. 38.1, for example.  Willful infringement may also be relevant to the applicable limitation period, to the assessment of costs or punitive damages, or to piercing the corporate veil.… Continue Reading

New Year, New Border Enforcement Measures in Effect

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property, Trade-marks

On December 31, 2014, the Canada Gazette published an order proclaiming into force sections 2, 5 and 6, subsection 7(6) and sections 43, 44 and 60 of the Combating Counterfeit Products Act, c. 32, S.C. 2014, as of January 1, 2015.  The Act itself received Royal Assent on December 9, 2014.

The principal effect of this order is to bring into force new border enforcement measures intended to combat the importation or exportation of trade-mark or copyright-infringing goods.[1]  These measures involve three main features:

  • Prohibitions on importation and exportation of infringing copies or goods[2] under the Copyright
Continue Reading

Supreme Court of Canada to Hear Landmark Pharmaceutical Section 8 Damages Case

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On October 30, 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada granted leave to Sanofi-Aventis’ (“Sanofi”) application for leave to appeal a decision of the Federal Court of Appeal (2014 FCA 68). By granting leave to Sanofi, the Supreme Court will now consider for the first time the correct interpretation of, and the correct legal framework applicable to quantifying section 8 damages under the Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations (“PM(NOC) Regulations”).

The PM(NOC) Regulations strike a balance between the interests of innovative pharmaceutical companies and generic manufacturers, by requiring generic manufacturers to address innovators’ patents before receiving … Continue Reading

Canada and the EU Successfully Conclude CETA: What It Means to the Pharmaceutical Industry

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On September 26, 2014, Prime Minister Harper announced that Canada and the European Union have successfully concluded negotiations on a new trade agreement, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) that was five years in the making, and publicly released the consolidated text of the agreement.

CETA is deeper in substance and broader in scope than any other such agreement in Canadian history, significantly affecting all economic areas, including the pharmaceutical sector.

The CETA chapter on intellectual property is of particular interest to the pharmaceutical industry, because it will introduce into Canada for the first time:

  • additional (sui generis
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Technological neutrality and copyright: Supreme Court grants leave to clarify scope in CBC v SODRAC

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

The Supreme Court granted leave to appeal on September 4, 2014 in another copyright case, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Société Radio-Canada v. SODRAC 2003 Inc. The appeal is from the decision of the Federal Court of Appeal which ruled that broadcasters must pay royalties for ephemeral recordings in accordance with the 1990 decision of the Supreme Court in Bishop v. Stevens.

In the Court of Appeal, CBC argued that Bishop v Stevens was no longer good law, having been overruled by a series of decisions of the Court which had, in various circumstances, made references to the … Continue Reading

Granting Trademark Protection to the Design and Layout of Retail Stores

Posted in Intellectual Property, Trade-marks

On July 10, 2014 the Court of Justice of the European Union (the “CJEU”) issued its decision in Apple Inc. v. Deutsches Patent und Markenamt[1] and recognized the possibility to register a three-dimensional representation of the design and layout of a retail store as a Community Trade Mark.

In May 12, 2010, Apple Inc. (“Apple”) filed two applications for marks that are described mainly as the design and layout of a retail store.[2] The United States Patent and Trademark Office (the “USPTO”) granted registration on January 22, 2013. The trademarks are each … Continue Reading

When Does an Employer own Copyright in a Photograph Made by an Employee?

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

An employee takes a photograph of a customer on the employer’s premises.  The employee has a signed employment agreement which states that all materials developed during the term of the contract are property of the employer.  The employer obtains a copy of the photograph and uses it in social media.  Later, the employee is terminated for cause.

The former employee sues for copyright infringement and, in the case of Mejia v. LaSalle College International Vancouver Inc., 2014 BCSC 1559, wins.  (The case also involved wrongful dismissal and defamation claims which were unsuccessful.)… Continue Reading

SAGD Patents and Applications in Canada

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

INTRODUCTION

In 1979, Dr. Robert Butler and his research team filed a Canadian patent application for the oil recovery technology known as Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (“SAGD”).  Over thirty years later, SAGD technology has become a formative oil-recovery process, with over two hundred patent applications filed in Canada relating to SAGD technology.

SAGD operations have increased primarily due to its potential to enhance bitumen recovery.[1]  Patent applications have been filed in respect of many aspects of SAGD technology, including the orientation of the wells, the composition of the wells themselves, and the infrastructure that is required to … Continue Reading

B.C. Supreme Court Breathes Life Into New Breed of Potential Pharma-Related Class Action Whereby Innovator Profits Are At Risk

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

In Canada, innovator drug companies can protect their market exclusivity from generic copycats by asserting patents against the generic manufacturer in litigation under the PM(NOC) Regulations. Until now, the consequences of losing PM(NOC) litigation was the potential payment of damages to the generic whose market access was delayed by the litigation. These so-called “section 8 damages” are limited to the actual loss suffered by the generic during that specific period of delay. Public policy is such that the profits earned by the innovator during that period cannot, however, be disgorged pursuant to section 8 of the PM(NOC) Regulations.… Continue Reading

YouTube, Facebook, Netflix liable to pay for music in Canada rules Copyright Board

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

On Friday, the Copyright Board released a decision and certified two SOCAN tariffs, Tariffs 22.D.1 (Internet – Online Audiovisual Services) and 22.D.2 (Internet – User-Generated Content). The years covered by the tariffs are 2007-2013.

The tariffs were certified based on agreements reached between SOCAN and objectors. Between the objectors and other entities which filed submissions, the heavyweights affected by the tariffs participated including Apple, Yahoo!, YouTube,  Netflix, Facebook, Cineplex, the members of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters (CAB), and the Canadian ISPS Rogers, Bell, and Shaw.

The decision of the Board is important. Its significance extends to both the … Continue Reading

Canada Patent Litigation: Federal Court Rules “Enhanced Disclosure” Requirement for Sound Prediction Applies Only To “New Use” Patents

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On July 2, 2014, Mr. Justice Rennie of the Federal Court released his judgment and reasons in Astrazeneca Canada Inc v. Apotex Inc., 2014 FC 638 dismissing AstraZeneca’s action for infringement and granting Apotex’s counterclaim for a declaration that Canadian Patent 2,139,653 (the “‘653 Patent”) is invalid. This patent relates to AstraZeneca’s successful drug NEXIUM® (esomeprazole).

Justice Rennie found the invention of the ‘653 Patent was novel and non-obvious, but nevertheless invalidated the patent for promising an improved therapeutic profile which was not soundly predicted.

While Justice Rennie canvassed a number of legal issues, his … Continue Reading

Interim Injunctive Relief Against Google as a Tool to Enforce Intellectual Property Rights Worldwide

Posted in Intellectual Property

Facts

Following the decision last month in which Google Inc. (“Google”) was ordered by the European Union’s Court of Justice to “forget” certain personal information[1], the Supreme Court of British Columbia (the “Court”) issued an interim injunction on June 13, 2014 against Google to remove certain websites from its worldwide Internet search engines. This interim injunction is part of an underlying action launched by Equustek Solutions Inc., a company that manufactures and sells complex industrial networking devices, (“Plaintiff”) against Datalinks and related companies (“Defendants”).

In the underlying action, the Plaintiff … Continue Reading

The Aereo Decision – Canadian Content?

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

Careful observers of the United States Supreme Court’s 6-3 decision yesterday in American Broadcasting Cos., Inc. et al v. Aereo, Inc. may have detected a small Canadian flavour in the majority’s reasoning. As will be revealed, this was no coincidence, and McCarthy Tétrault played a small role by filing an amicus brief on behalf of a coalition of international rights holders and copyright scholars that drew the Court’s attention to the need to interpret the US Copyright Act in a technologically neutral way, as similar copyright laws have been construed by the Supreme Court of Canada and the European Court … Continue Reading

Federal Court Dismisses Notion that Patents Should be Given Only One Interpretation for All Purposes

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

Summary

In a pair of simultaneously released decisions on June 13, 2014, Justice O’Reilly allowed Allergan’s applications (the “Applications”) prohibiting the Minister of Health from issuing NOCs to Cobalt (now “Actavis”) (2014 FC 566) and Apotex (2014 FC 567) to market their generic versions of LUMIGAN RC® until the expiry of Canadian Patent 2,585,691 (the “‘691 Patent”) in 2026.

Allergan was represented by Andrew Reddon, Steven Mason, Steven Tanner and Sanjaya Mendis of McCarthy Tétrault LLP.

Background

Allergan originally marketed a 0.03% bimatoprost (“Bp”) containing formulation for treating glaucoma called LUMIGAN, … Continue Reading

PM(NOC) Proceedings: Apotex defeats Bayer’s Canadian patent on oral contraceptive YAZ

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On June 4, 2014 Justice Roger Hughes of the Federal Court released his public reasons for dismissing Bayer’s prohibition application against Apotex in respect of its generic YAZ tablets on the basis that Apotex’s non-infringement allegation was justified. His confidential judgment was issued on May 7, 2014 and Apotex received its NOC the very next day. The term of Bayer’s patent was not set to expire until August 31, 2020. For the full written decision see: Bayer Inc. et al. v. Apotex Inc. et al. 2014 FC 436.

Although not determinative, this decision addresses the somewhat contentious issue of … Continue Reading

Canadian Trademarks: Cathay Pacific wins battle over “Asia Miles” versus “Air Miles”

Posted in Intellectual Property, Trade-marks

On June 11, 2014 Justice O’Reilly of the Federal Court released his decision relating to the registerability of the trademark “Asia Miles” in light of opposition from Air Miles International.

The trade-marks opposition board had upheld Air Miles International’s opposition to the registration of “Asia Miles”.  Justice O’Reilly, on an application for judicial review, interfered with the Board’s findings and sent it back for reconsideration.

For the full written decision see: Cathay Pacific v. Air Miles International, 2014 FC 549.

This decision is important to the law of trademarks for the following reasons:

  1. Use of a mark includes
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Notice and notice regime under C-11 coming into force

Posted in Copyright, Privacy

The Government announced today that the notice and notice regime established under C-11 is coming into force. The delay in bringing these provisions into force was a consultations on possible regulations that the regime permitted. The Government announced that the provisions are coming into force without regulations.

The regime permits copyright owners to send notices to internet service providers and other internet intermediaries claiming infringement of copyright. The notices must be passed on by these service providers to their users. Because there are no regulations, the notices must be processed and passed on by the internet intermediaries without any fees … Continue Reading