snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Monthly Archives: March 2017

A Canadian Perspective: Proposed Amendments to Delaware’s General Corporation Law Would Enable Use of Blockchain

Posted in Fintech, Regulatory Compliance

On March 13, 2017, the Council of the Corporation Law Section of the Delaware State Bar Association released proposed legislation that would amend Title 8 of Delaware’s General Corporation Law (DGCL) to permit Delaware corporations to use blockchain technology to create and manage corporate records.

Currently, stock ledgers in Delaware corporations are typically maintained by a corporate secretary or transfer agent, who manually updates the ledger upon receipt of notification of a transfer of share ownership. The proposed amendments would permit Delaware corporations to use electronic networks or databases, such as distributed ledgers, to administer corporate records and track share … Continue Reading

Drug testing in Canadian patent suit not permitted to be used in foreign litigation

Posted in Intellectual Property, Litigation, Patents

In a rare case where drug samples were given under consent in an NOC proceeding Novartis sought, but was denied, to use these samples in a related litigation in Portugal (2016 FC 1091).

Samples are rarely provided in NOC proceedings. Nevertheless, production may be compelled if samples were provided to the Minister as part of the drug submission (Patented Medicines (Notice of Compliance) Regulations (SOR/93-133), s. 6(7)). This was not the situation in this case where Mylan consented to producing the samples, subject to the existing protective order.… Continue Reading

Misguided Policy: CASL’s Private Right of Action for Competition Act Reviewable Conduct

Posted in Anti-Spam

While much has been written about the impending CASL private rights of action, less has been said about the new private right of action CASL will tack on to the Competition Act for misrepresentations in electronic messages. ‎

The new CASL private right of action for reviewable conduct under section 74.011 of the Competition Act is an aberration, which will be inconsistent with and offensive to the current regime by which the Competition Act addresses deceptive marketing practices.  It will make misrepresentations in electronic messages the only such reviewable conduct which will be subject to private damage claims, and … Continue Reading

Website operator jailed for distributing copyright infringing copies of musical works: R v Evans

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property, Litigation

Is operating a website that provides links to torrent websites which facilitates unauthorized downloading of musical works a criminal offence? If so, can the operator of such sites expect jail time as punishment for this crime? In a recent decision of the English and Wales Court of Appeal in Evans, R. v [2017] EWCA Crim 139 (14 February 201), the accused, Mr Evans, was convicted of two offences of distributing infringing copies of musical works and was sentenced to 12 months in prison for these crimes.… Continue Reading

Blockchain applications may be caught by Ontario’s securities law

Posted in Fintech, Regulatory Compliance

The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) has issued a press release advising stakeholders that Ontario securities law may apply to any use of distributed ledger technologies (DLT), such as blockchain, as part of financial products or service offerings.

The OSC emphasized that it is keen to support the innovative potential of DLT because, among other things, DLT has the potential to increase transparency and efficiencies in the capital markets. However, because of DLT’s novelty, the OSC encourages business to speak to the OSC about securities law and investor protection requirements that may apply.

The OSC has cautioned that “[p]roducts or other … Continue Reading

TPMs Are Alive and Well: Canada’s Federal Court Awards Nintendo $12.7-million in Damages

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property, Litigation

Five years ago, Canada enacted legal protection for technological protection measures (TPMs) as part of the Copyright Modernization Act. The Federal Court has now  rendered the first decision  interpreting  these important rights. In short, the court  made it clear that legal protection for TPMs were meant to foster innovation in the creative industries and that businesses blatantly engaging in industrial scale TPM circumvention activities will be dealt with harshly by the courts.

In Nintendo of America Inc. v. King & Go Cyber Shopping (2005) Ltd., 2017 FC 246 (docket here; decision available soon on the Federal Court website and … Continue Reading

Initiatives des Autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières sur les Fintech : bac à sable réglementaire et coopération

Posted in Fintech, Regulatory Compliance

Le 23 février 2017, les Autorités canadiennes en valeurs mobilières (ACVM) ont annoncé le lancement d’un bac à sable réglementaire. L’objectif du bac à sable réglementaire est d’appuyer les Fintech en leur permettant de faire une demande à l’organisme de réglementation compétent afin de bénéficier d’une approche plus adaptée en matière de réglementation. Cette approche doit faciliter l’utilisation d’applications, de produits et de services novateurs chez les entreprises au Canada, tout en protégeant adéquatement les investisseurs.… Continue Reading

Federal Court of Appeal allows $6.5 million lump sum cost consequence

Posted in Litigation

In a recent appeal (2017 FCA 25) relating to the issue of costs following a patent infringement trial, the Federal Court of Appeal commented that lump sum awards have found increasing favour with courts, and for good reason as they save the parties time and money. Lump sum costs awards further the objective of the Federal Courts Rules of securing “the just, most expeditious and least expensive determination” of proceedings (Rule 3). When a court can award costs on a lump sum basis, granular analyses are avoided and the costs hearing does not become an exercise in accounting. … Continue Reading