snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Monthly Archives: January 2016

Goldman Sachs Files Patent for Cryptocurrency “SETLcoin”

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents, Virtual Currency

The transformational potential behind the popular cryptocurrency bitcoin continues to draw the interest of traditional financial institutions looking to ready their core businesses for a wave of new financial technology. The aspect of bitcoin that appears to be of the greatest interest to financial services organizations is not the currency itself, but the underlying blockchain technology. This technology is what enables the integrity of trading systems without a central authority.

On October 30, 2014, Goldman Sachs filed a patent application titled “Cryptographic Currency for Securities Settlement”, which claimed priority to an earlier provisional patent application filed in May 15, 2014. … Continue Reading

Online Trust Alliance IoT Trust Framework Nears Release

Posted in Privacy, Regulatory Compliance

Throughout 2015, the Online Trust Alliance (“OTA”) (a U.S.-based non-profit organization which originated in 2005 as an informal industry working group drawn largely from the technology and marketing communities) has been working on a so-called “Trust Framework” for the Internet of Things. An earlier post covered the release of the first discussion draft in August.

After a public comment period, the OTA issued a “last call” draft in October, and followed up with a “pre-release” draft on December 3, 2015.

Although this draft is described as “pre-release”, the OTA’s consultation process for the framework appears to be over now. … Continue Reading

Work and Play All in One — Mitigating Risks of Security Incidents and Privacy Breaches in BYOD Programs

Posted in Privacy

Given the popularity and prevalence of mobile devices such as smart phones and tablets in today’s world, it is no surprise that Bring Your Own Device (“BYOD”) programs have become an increasingly common arrangement for organizations. BYOD programs allow employees to use their own mobile device for both personal and business purposes, blurring the traditional line between work and play. A recent report indicates that more than 75% of Canadian businesses support employee-purchased smartphones and tablets in the workplace.[1]

Properly implemented BYOD programs are appealing to organizations for many reasons. First, it allows them to save substantially … Continue Reading