snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Monthly Archives: September 2014

Bitcoin accepted here? Funding M&A transactions by way of Bitcoin

Posted in E-Commerce, M&A/Finance

There is no denying the increasing popularity and notoriety of the virtual currency Bitcoin.  Bitcoin market capitalization currently stands in the billions of dollars, with over 13 million Bitcoins having been mined and made available for circulation.  An increasing number of merchants, including Dell, have begun accepting payment by way of Bitcoin.  The list of goods and services that have been purchased with Bitcoin now includes university tuition, airline tickets, cars, and pizza delivery.  Some companies have started paying employees in Bitcoins.  Canada in particular has been a world leader in Bitcoin ATM’s: the first Bitcoin ATM in the world … Continue Reading

Technological neutrality and copyright: Supreme Court grants leave to clarify scope in CBC v SODRAC

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

The Supreme Court granted leave to appeal on September 4, 2014 in another copyright case, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Société Radio-Canada v. SODRAC 2003 Inc. The appeal is from the decision of the Federal Court of Appeal which ruled that broadcasters must pay royalties for ephemeral recordings in accordance with the 1990 decision of the Supreme Court in Bishop v. Stevens.

In the Court of Appeal, CBC argued that Bishop v Stevens was no longer good law, having been overruled by a series of decisions of the Court which had, in various circumstances, made references to the … Continue Reading

CASL’s inscrutable computer program provisions to be tackled by CRTC

Posted in Anti-Spam

With the computer program sections of Canada’s anti-spam/anti-malware law (CASL) coming into force in January 2015, the CRTC has now started reaching out to the public for questions they want guidance on in FAQs or bulletins. I attended such a session last week (on September 9, 2014) at an IT.CAN Public Affairs Forum Roundtable. The attendees were Dana-Lynn Wood (Senior Enforcement Officer, Electronic Commerce Enforcement, CRTC) Kelly-Anne Smith (Legal Counsel, Legal Sector CRTC), and Andre Leduc (Manager of the National Anti-spam Coordinating Body, Industry Canada).… Continue Reading

Granting Trademark Protection to the Design and Layout of Retail Stores

Posted in Intellectual Property, Trade-marks

On July 10, 2014 the Court of Justice of the European Union (the “CJEU”) issued its decision in Apple Inc. v. Deutsches Patent und Markenamt[1] and recognized the possibility to register a three-dimensional representation of the design and layout of a retail store as a Community Trade Mark.

In May 12, 2010, Apple Inc. (“Apple”) filed two applications for marks that are described mainly as the design and layout of a retail store.[2] The United States Patent and Trademark Office (the “USPTO”) granted registration on January 22, 2013. The trademarks are each … Continue Reading

“Objectively Reasonable” and Privacy: Recent Developments

Posted in Privacy

The ubiquitous and rapidly-evolving nature of technology has recently necessitated serious consideration of our “reasonable expectation of privacy.”  This concept is at the core of Canadian privacy law. In particular, the concept is a key part of the Charter test for s. 8, the right to be secure against unreasonable search and seizure. The Supreme Court of Canada (“SCC”) grappled with these questions in R v Cole[1] and R v Vu[2], and more recently, the British Columbia and Ontario Courts of Appeal applied these Charter principles to couriered packages and USB keys in R Continue Reading

When Does an Employer own Copyright in a Photograph Made by an Employee?

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

An employee takes a photograph of a customer on the employer’s premises.  The employee has a signed employment agreement which states that all materials developed during the term of the contract are property of the employer.  The employer obtains a copy of the photograph and uses it in social media.  Later, the employee is terminated for cause.

The former employee sues for copyright infringement and, in the case of Mejia v. LaSalle College International Vancouver Inc., 2014 BCSC 1559, wins.  (The case also involved wrongful dismissal and defamation claims which were unsuccessful.)… Continue Reading