snIP/ITs Insights on Canadian Technology and Intellectual Property Law

Monthly Archives: July 2014

YouTube, Facebook, Netflix liable to pay for music in Canada rules Copyright Board

Posted in Copyright, Intellectual Property

On Friday, the Copyright Board released a decision and certified two SOCAN tariffs, Tariffs 22.D.1 (Internet – Online Audiovisual Services) and 22.D.2 (Internet – User-Generated Content). The years covered by the tariffs are 2007-2013.

The tariffs were certified based on agreements reached between SOCAN and objectors. Between the objectors and other entities which filed submissions, the heavyweights affected by the tariffs participated including Apple, Yahoo!, YouTube,  Netflix, Facebook, Cineplex, the members of the Canadian Association of Broadcasters (CAB), and the Canadian ISPS Rogers, Bell, and Shaw.

The decision of the Board is important. Its significance extends to both the … Continue Reading

CASL Guidance for Registered Charities

Posted in Anti-Spam

Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (“CASL”), which came into force on July 1, 2014, is considered to be the toughest commercial electronic messaging (“CEM”) legislation in the world, with substantial fines for violations (including fines up to $10 million for organizations).

While CASL’s prohibition on sending CEMs (without adhering to prescribed consent, form and unsubscribe requirements) applies to all organizations, the regulations exempt CEMs sent by a registered charity (as defined under Canada’s federal Income Tax Act) where the primary purpose of the CEM is to raise funds for the charity.

Registered charities making efforts to comply … Continue Reading

Canada Patent Litigation: Federal Court Rules “Enhanced Disclosure” Requirement for Sound Prediction Applies Only To “New Use” Patents

Posted in Intellectual Property, Patents

On July 2, 2014, Mr. Justice Rennie of the Federal Court released his judgment and reasons in Astrazeneca Canada Inc v. Apotex Inc., 2014 FC 638 dismissing AstraZeneca’s action for infringement and granting Apotex’s counterclaim for a declaration that Canadian Patent 2,139,653 (the “‘653 Patent”) is invalid. This patent relates to AstraZeneca’s successful drug NEXIUM® (esomeprazole).

Justice Rennie found the invention of the ‘653 Patent was novel and non-obvious, but nevertheless invalidated the patent for promising an improved therapeutic profile which was not soundly predicted.

While Justice Rennie canvassed a number of legal issues, his … Continue Reading

Services Matrec inc. c. CFH Sécurité inc.

Posted in Contracting/Outsourcing

En février dernier, la Cour d’appel du Québec a rendu une décision comportant des implications majeures relativement à l’interprétation des contrats de services risquant très certainement de modifier la façon dont ces contrats sont rédigés et négociés. Bien qu’il soit admis que les dispositions du Code civil du Québec applicables aux contrats nommés, dont le contrat de services, soient de nature supplétive, la question de savoir ce qu’il advient lors de la reconduction du contrat au-delà du terme prévu intialement demeurait sans réponse. Dans Services Matrec inc. c. CFH Sécurité inc. la Cour d’appel doit déterminer si une renonciation à … Continue Reading

Interim Injunctive Relief Against Google as a Tool to Enforce Intellectual Property Rights Worldwide

Posted in Intellectual Property

Facts

Following the decision last month in which Google Inc. (“Google”) was ordered by the European Union’s Court of Justice to “forget” certain personal information[1], the Supreme Court of British Columbia (the “Court”) issued an interim injunction on June 13, 2014 against Google to remove certain websites from its worldwide Internet search engines. This interim injunction is part of an underlying action launched by Equustek Solutions Inc., a company that manufactures and sells complex industrial networking devices, (“Plaintiff”) against Datalinks and related companies (“Defendants”).

In the underlying action, the Plaintiff … Continue Reading